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The gender of caste : representing dalits in print

By: Gupta, Charu.
Series: Hedgehog and Fox series. / edited by Rudrangshu Mukherjee.Publisher: Ranikhet Permanent Black 2016Description: xvii, 336p.ISBN: 9788178244990.Subject(s): Dalits | Gender and casteDDC classification: 305.5688 | G959g Summary: Caste and gender are complex markers of difference, hierarchy, and inequality. They have rarely been addressed together in the context of colonial India. The Gender of Caste rethinks the history of caste from a gendered perspective by exploring its connections with print–public–popular culture. Charu Gupta shows that the creation by elites of hegemonic print and literary practices involved the operation of caste and gender in tandem. Caste and gender constituted society in vital ways and caste was central to how gender was reproduced. Deriving her material from Uttar Pradesh a century ago, she shows that ideas about gender were critical to caste practices in relation to Dalits. Historicizing several axes along which Dalits were represented—gender, caste, class, and community, she extends the preoccupations of Indian feminists and Dalit historians. Utilizing the lens of ‘representation’, she examines ideological discourses that constructed Dalits generally, and Dalit women specifically. Such constructions, she argues, suggest the implicit collusion of colonizers, nationalists, reformers, and Dalits themselves. She takes us through historical narratives that helped engender images of Dalits and ‘untouchable’ women, reifications which North Indians internalized and reproduced towards a cultural ‘common sense’ that persists into our own time. This book questions both the presumptive ‘upper-casteness’ of feminist studies and the presumptive maleness of most Dalit studies of the colonial period. Dalit masculinity, remembrances of 1857, popular vocabularies and idioms, conversion anxieties, and the difficulties of indentured labour are among the many themes of this book—a major expansion of the field.
List(s) this item appears in: New arrival Feb.17 to 23, 2020
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books P K Kelkar Library, IIT Kanpur
General Stacks 305.5688 G959g (Browse shelf) Checked out to Syed Feroz Hassan (E0590800) 28/11/2020 A185265
Total holds: 0

Caste and gender are complex markers of difference, hierarchy, and inequality. They have rarely been addressed together in the context of colonial India. The Gender of Caste rethinks the history of caste from a gendered perspective by exploring its connections with print–public–popular culture. Charu Gupta shows that the creation by elites of hegemonic print and literary practices involved the operation of caste and gender in tandem. Caste and gender constituted society in vital ways and caste was central to how gender was reproduced. Deriving her material from Uttar Pradesh a century ago, she shows that ideas about gender were critical to caste practices in relation to Dalits. Historicizing several axes along which Dalits were represented—gender, caste, class, and community, she extends the preoccupations of Indian feminists and Dalit historians. Utilizing the lens of ‘representation’, she examines ideological discourses that constructed Dalits generally, and Dalit women specifically. Such constructions, she argues, suggest the implicit collusion of colonizers, nationalists, reformers, and Dalits themselves. She takes us through historical narratives that helped engender images of Dalits and ‘untouchable’ women, reifications which North Indians internalized and reproduced towards a cultural ‘common sense’ that persists into our own time. This book questions both the presumptive ‘upper-casteness’ of feminist studies and the presumptive maleness of most Dalit studies of the colonial period. Dalit masculinity, remembrances of 1857, popular vocabularies and idioms, conversion anxieties, and the difficulties of indentured labour are among the many themes of this book—a major expansion of the field.

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