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Money, social ontology and law

By: Condello, Angela.
Contributor(s): Ferraris, Maurizio | Searle, John Rogers.
Series: Law and politics: continental perspectives series. / edited by Mariano Croce.Publisher: Oxon Routledge 2019Description: vi, 80p.ISBN: 9780367191115.Subject(s): Money -- Social aspects | Money -- Philosophy | Economics -- Sociological aspectsDDC classification: 306.34 | C751m Summary: Presenting legal and philosophical essays on money, this book explores the conditions according to which an object like a piece of paper, or an electronic signal, has come to be seen as having a value. Money plays a crucial role in the regulation of social relationships, and their normative determination. It is thus integral to the very nature of the "social", and the question of how society is kept together by a network of agreements, conventions, exchanges, and codes. The technologies of money discussed here by Searle, Ferraris and Condello show how we conceive the category of the social at the intersection of individual and collective intentionality, documentality and materiality. All of which, as the introduction to this volume demonstrates, is of vital importance for legal theory; and for a whole series of legal concepts that are core issues in reflections on the relationship between law, philosophy, and society.
List(s) this item appears in: New arrival November 4 to 10, 2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books P K Kelkar Library, IIT Kanpur
General Stacks 306.34 C751m (Browse shelf) Available A184943
Total holds: 1

Presenting legal and philosophical essays on money, this book explores the conditions according to which an object like a piece of paper, or an electronic signal, has come to be seen as having a value.

Money plays a crucial role in the regulation of social relationships, and their normative determination. It is thus integral to the very nature of the "social", and the question of how society is kept together by a network of agreements, conventions, exchanges, and codes. The technologies of money discussed here by Searle, Ferraris and Condello show how we conceive the category of the social at the intersection of individual and collective intentionality, documentality and materiality. All of which, as the introduction to this volume demonstrates, is of vital importance for legal theory; and for a whole series of legal concepts that are core issues in reflections on the relationship between law, philosophy, and society.

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